Exposure to COVID-19 – The University of Tennessee System

Exposure to COVID-19 – The University of Tennessee System

Exposure to COVID-19 – The University of Tennessee System

Exposure to COVID-19 – The University of Tennessee System

May 4, 2021

A Decision Tree for UT System Administration employees

Contact within 6 feet for 10 minutes or more with a person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19.

Examples include:

If Yes, proceed to next question.

If Yes, proceed to next question.

If No, then self-isolate/quarantine for 14 days before returning to work and get tested. Continue to wear a mask, socially distance and wash your hands.

If Yes, proceed to next question.

If COVID-19 test is positive, you may return to work 10 days from onset of symptoms only if you are fever-free (without use of fever-reducing medication) and have improvement of symptoms for at least 24 hours.

If COVID-19 test is positive, you may return to work 10 days from onset of symptoms ONLY if you are fever-free (without use of fever-reducing medication) and have improvement of symptoms for at least 24 hours.

You may return to work 10 days from onset of symptoms ONLY if you are fever-free (without use of fever-reducing medication) and have improvement of symptoms for at least 24 hours.

Tennessee Department of Health Resources for Colleges and Universities. (Aug. 6, 2020)

Tennessee Department of Health: What to Do If Your Test Results are Negative. (April 2020)


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Exposure to COVID-19 - The University of Tennessee System
COVID-19 Dashboard Q&A  UT Business Intelligence

COVID-19 Dashboard Q&A UT Business Intelligence

May 4, 2021

What is NOWCast?

It is difficult to reliably estimate COVID-19 trends for most of the 95 counties in Tennessee. Most counties are small and changes of only a few cases a day can mean dramatic changes in disease rates. Additionally, overworked labs and public health staff mean that data may not be updated every day. NOWcast uses modern statistical methods to estimate the trends that describe all these noisy data. The NOWcast groups together similar counties, then estimates recent changes in disease rates, and projects those changes forward. In nation-wide validation, the NOWcast accurately describes county-level trends one week into the future.

When the TN Department of Health needs to make corrections to a previous days data, they do it by putting a correcting entry in a later days numbers. For instance, if they overcount tests by 6,000 on Tuesday, then on Wednesday theyll put in -6,000 tests to correct the total. That can make it appears as though there were -6,000 tests administered on Wednesday, which obviously isnt possible. Its like correcting entries in financial accounts.

This indicates that data is not available or to mask divide by zero errors. This should only occur in counties with very few cases.

Per capita figures are derived by dividing a metrics value by the US Census Bureaus 2019 estimate of population in the area. Percent change per capita figures are an expression of the difference between today and last weeks values divided by last weeks value. This metric gives you a sense of how much a metric is changing in a way that controls for population.

Aggregate of students, faculty, and staff. Students counts are from the official Fall 2019 census based on home addresses and only include in-state students. Faculty and staff are any active employees that worked during the 2019 fiscal year (July 2018 June 2019) based on home addresses.

UT pop. residing in county last fall is also known as the UT Home Population (see question above). UT pop. in county at campus last fall is the aggregate count of students, faculty, and staff that were learning or working at the respective campus in the selected county (including out-of-state and international).

UT pop. residing in county last fall includes only students, faculty, and staff who have a permanent address in Tennessee. UT pop. in county at campus last fall includes students, faculty, and staff that were learning or working at the respective campus in the selected county (including out-of-state and international).

The Tennessee Department of Health does not provide testing and outcome metrics at a county level.

Hospitalizations are included in the active case counts as provided to the Tennessee Department of Health (recoveries, active, hospitalizations, and death cases are not exclusive categories).

Total case positivity rate is calculated over the past seven (7) days and therefore excludes any tests prior. Hovering over the total case positivity rate visual will give you a rolling trend of the positivity rate.

Total case positivity rate is calculated over the past seven (7) days and therefore excludes any tests prior. Tested per 100K and percent of population metrics include all data since data collection began for that county.

Cases of COVID-19 are reported to the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) by clinicians and laboratories across the state. Initially, public health has fairly limited information about each person that has tested positive, such as their name, date of birth, and address. Public health professionals contact every case of COVID-19 statewide to interview them and learn more about their illness, exposures and contacts.

The information that TDH receives from clinicians and laboratories is sometimes incomplete or occasionally incorrect. As we work to publish updated case counts and basic information on our website as quickly as possible, sometimes this information changes as it is updated, and correct information is learned during the investigation. This may mean that a case can move from one county to another once the patients county of residence is confirmed during their interview.

If someone had COVID-19 when they died, they will be counted as a COVID-19 death. An exception to this is when a case died of something completely independent to COVID-19, like due to a car wreck.

Hospitalization data reflect the cumulative (total) number of cases that were ever hospitalized from COVID-19. It does not reflect the number of people currently hospitalized. Cases among Tennessee residents are counted by their county of residence. Residents of other states who were tested at Tennessee healthcare facilities or laboratories are counted as Out of TN.

Laboratory reports of positive cases are reported to metro and local health departments as soon as results are available. State numbers are updated at 2 p.m. CDT daily. There may be a lag in the reporting of cumulative numbers at the state level. Metro Health Departments may also include individuals from out of Tennessee in their localized counts if the case is remaining in that county throughout the course of their illness.

COVID-19 is a reportable condition in Tennessee. This means that clinicians and laboratories are required to report known cases to the Department of Health within 24 hours.

The Department of Health receives lab results (both positive and negative) from laboratories daily, and data from healthcare providers within 24 hours of identifying a case of COVID-19.

All Tennessee population figures used as comparisons in this dashboard are obtained from the U.S. Census Bureaus 2019 Vintage Housing and Population Estimates.


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COVID-19 Dashboard Q&A UT Business Intelligence
Sweetwater, TN Coronavirus Information – Safety Updates …

Sweetwater, TN Coronavirus Information – Safety Updates …

May 4, 2021

Powered by Watson:

Our COVID Q&A with Watson is an AI-powered chatbot that addresses consumers' questions and concerns about COVID-19. It's built on the IBM Watson Ads Builder platform, which utilizes Watson Natural Language Understanding, and proprietary, natural- language-generation technology. The chatbot utilizes approved content from the CDC and WHO. Incidents information is provided by USAFacts.org.

To populate our Interactive Incidents Map, Watson AI looks for the latest and most up-to- date information. To understand and extract the information necessary to feed the maps, we use Watson Natural Language Understandingfor extracting insights from natural language text and Watson Discovery for extracting insights from PDFs, HTML, tables, images and more.COVID Impact Survey, conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago for the Data Foundation


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Sweetwater, TN Coronavirus Information - Safety Updates ...
Availability – TN COVID-19 Hub

Availability – TN COVID-19 Hub

May 4, 2021

Walk-ins Accepted Daily at State Health Departments

I Want To Find... Search Site:

Find COVID-19 Resources For:

COVID-19 Vaccines are now widely available to all Tennesseans 16+ in all 95 counties across our state. Check COVID-19 vaccine appointment availability at any of the state health departments on the map below, or browse all vaccine providers and find a location close to you at VaccineFinder.org.

Percentage of Appointments Available

VaccineFinder helps you find clinics, pharmacies, and other locations across Tennessee that offer COVID-19 vaccines. Their interactive map lets you find a location close to you and segment by vaccine availability and manufacturer.

Safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19 have arrived in Tennessee. Lets set the record straight on myths circulating about the COVID-19 vaccine.

COVID19 Informational Video


Follow this link: Availability - TN COVID-19 Hub
India is Added to COVID-19 Geographic Travel Ban – The National Law Review

India is Added to COVID-19 Geographic Travel Ban – The National Law Review

May 4, 2021

Ashley Moore is a Business Immigration Associate in Wiggin and Danas Labor, Employment and Benefits Department in the New Haven office.

Prior to joining Wiggin and Dana, Ashley worked for a boutique immigration firm in St. Louis, MO, as an associate immigration attorney. She has experience with advising and counseling clients on immigration benefits and consequences and has worked on a wide range of immigration cases, including family-based immigrant visas, removal of conditions, naturalization, asylum, removal defense, employment-based visas...


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India is Added to COVID-19 Geographic Travel Ban - The National Law Review
COVID-19 variants in Texas: What you need to know – The Texas Tribune

COVID-19 variants in Texas: What you need to know – The Texas Tribune

May 4, 2021

Last winter, health experts worried about COVID-19 variants spreading quickly across the state, further overwhelming already crammed intensive care units. While health officials remain concerned about the potential for a wider outbreak fueled by more contagious variants, new case averages, hospitalizations and deaths are still trending down in Texas as the number of people fully vaccinated statewide has passed 25%.

Nationwide, the average weekly number of new COVID-19 cases has dropped in more than half of states as 29% of Americans are now fully vaccinated.

While COVID-19 started out as one strain, it has since spawned dozens of recorded mutations, said Benjamin Neuman, a virologist and professor at Texas A&M University.

Variants are a concern because some spread more easily, may cause severe illness in more people and could be resistant to current treatments for COVID-19. Some experts worry that as more mutations pop up, hospitalizations and deaths may rise as well. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says vaccines and other preventive measures like social distancing and mask-wearing should protect people from variants.

Heres what you need to know about COVID-19 variants in Texas:

Which variants are being tracked by the state?

The most dominant strain in Texas and the country is currently the B.1.1.7 variant from the United Kingdom, first detected in the United States in December. The CDC has also listed mutations first discovered in California, South Africa and Brazil as variants of concern. So far in Texas, cases of the five CDC variants of concern have slowly increased since the winter: more than 2,000 variant cases have been reported to the Department of State Health Services as of April 29, though the actual number may be higher, said Jennifer Shuford, the chief state epidemiologist. In early March, Houston became the first city in the state to report at least one case of each variant of concern.

The first variant to be publicly identified and reported out of Texas, the Brazos Valley variant, was discovered by Texas A&M scientists in mid-April. Neuman said they identified three Brazos Valley mutations BV-1, BV-2 and BV-3 of which only five cases have been reported.

Neuman said while BV variants have gotten wide attention, others have been present in the state as well. From a public health standpoint, its important to keep watching for new variants while case numbers are still low, he said.

Texas is a gold mine, Neuman said. The COVID strains we have in Texas are largely unexplored at the moment, and the virus is out there changing and evolving every day, whether were paying attention to it or not. I would imagine there are quite a few other surprises lurking out there in places where were just starting to look.

How do they test for variants and how much testing is the state doing?

Checking for COVID-19 mutations starts with the typical PCR or antigen test, usually in the form of nose or mouth swabs tens of thousands of which are conducted every day in the state. However, not every test gets put through the rigorous genomic sequencing required to find a mutation, which can cost labs around $50 to $100 and on average takes a week or more. Shuford said many universities are sequencing all of their positive tests, but many public health labs prioritize certain types of cases for example, if an otherwise healthy child were hospitalized with COVID-19 and do additional random sampling.

More populous regions of the state, like the Dallas-Fort Worth area and southeast Texas, are reporting higher numbers of variant cases but this could be a reflection of more widespread testing in urban areas.

Houston Methodists genomics lab has sequenced every positive test from patients in its health care system roughly 50,000 genomes across 40,000 patients since the pandemic began, said James Musser, the networks chair of pathology. Musser said Houston Methodists sequencing effort may be the largest of its kind in the nation and the scale of its sequencing database allows it to have more detailed information about the progression of variants in Texas.

Musser estimated that up to 80% of new COVID-19 cases in Houston Methodists network have been the UK variant, peaking in April. Higher proportions of variants have not substantially impacted Houstons general case ranges, he said.

Will Texas do more testing for variants in the future?

Shuford said Texas needs to ramp up its genomic sequencing efforts, and once that happens, she said reported variant cases may increase as well.

Currently, the state is waiting on more federal funding to improve testing capacity for variants at public labs and help those labs better report and share data. Whether Texas sees a rise in variants is going to be dependent on testing, and testing was cut in half by the big freeze at the end of February, Neuman said. You cant find what you dont test for.

Can vaccination prevent more COVID-19 mutations?

Multiple experts said vaccination is one of the strongest ways to combat the spread of variants and reduce the chance that the virus will keep mutating. But vaccine rates have decreased in Texas, and rates among Black and Hispanic residents have lagged behind white and Asian Texans in part because of barriers like lack of transportation and distance from vaccine providers.

Because the state is far from herd immunity, transmission of more contagious variants will continue to increase, said Bhavna Lall, assistant professor of adult medicine at the University of Houston College of Medicine. No matter how much progress the United States makes toward testing and vaccinating residents, Lall said global inequities in vaccine distribution will continue to impact everyone, including Texans.

Pointing to Indias recent crisis the countrys seven-day average of new cases has passed 370,000 while hospitalizations and deaths have skyrocketed and new variants continuing to pop up worldwide, Lall said until the United States and other developed countries help vaccinate other parts of the world, we will always be in this pandemic."

Just because we vaccinate our population in America does not mean that we are going to be safe from other variants that are forming in other countries, Lall said.

Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to speed on the most essential Texas news.

Disclosure: Texas A&M University has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune's journalism. Find a complete list of them here.


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Cuomo, Governor Murphy and Governor Lamont Announce Significant Easing Of COVID-19 Pandemic Restrictions on Businesses, Gatherings and Venues -…

Cuomo, Governor Murphy and Governor Lamont Announce Significant Easing Of COVID-19 Pandemic Restrictions on Businesses, Gatherings and Venues -…

May 4, 2021

Event Venues

Congregate commercial and social events in New Yorksuch as those at venues that host sports competitions, performing arts and live entertainment, and catered receptionscan exceed the social gathering limits of 500 people outdoors or 250 people indoors if all attendees over the age of four present either proof of full vaccination status or recent negative COVID-19 test result and the required social distancing can be accommodated.

Starting May 19, large-scale indoor event venues willoperate at 30 percent capacity, which is an increase from the current 10 percent capacity limit.Large-scale outdoor event venues will operate at 33 percent.Social distancing, masks, and other applicablehealth protocols will still apply, including the requirement of attendee proof of full vaccination or recent negative COVID-19 test result.

Industry Reopening Requirements

While most industry capacity restrictions will be lifted, industry-specific requirements will remain in effect for a longer period of time, including state or local health authority event notification, health screening, contact information for tracing, enhanced air handling and building system standards, hand hygiene, and environmental cleaning and disinfection protocols. The State will continue to provide additional guidance on these provisions as they apply to each industry.

Today's announcement builds on GovernorCuomo's recent measures to further reopen the economy amid a steady decline in New York's COVID-19 positivity and hospitalization rates. On April 30, Governor Cuomo announced thatNew York City indoor diningwill expand to 75 percent capacity beginning May 7, bringing New York City in line with the rest of New York. The Governor also announced that hair salons, barber shops and other personal care services will expand to 75 percent capacity beginning May 7. New York City gyms and fitness centers will expand to 50 percent capacity beginning May 15. On April 28,Governor Cuomo announcedthat thefood and beverage service, and catered event, curfewswould end this month.

Connecticut Previously Announced:


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Cuomo, Governor Murphy and Governor Lamont Announce Significant Easing Of COVID-19 Pandemic Restrictions on Businesses, Gatherings and Venues -...
Bentz urges Gov. Brown to lift renewed COVID-19 restrictions – KTVZ

Bentz urges Gov. Brown to lift renewed COVID-19 restrictions – KTVZ

May 4, 2021

WASHINGTON (KTVZ) -- Rep. Cliff Bentz, R-Ore., issued a statement Monday calling on Governor Kate Brown to end the recently reinstituted COVID-19 restrictions.

Here's the statement, in full:

"In the normal course, as a United States Representative, I would not enter debates regarding state-level politics. However, the Governors most recent response to the COVID-19 situation is not only historically broad in impact, but an action that causes far more serious damage than benefit.Additionally, in recent days, the Oregon Health Authority actually invited public input from Oregons congressional delegation.

"Governor Kate Browns decision to again lock down huge parts of Oregon has caused incredible frustration for many in my district, and I share their frustration. In a recent letter by Governor Brown, she commended Oregonians for helping make our state among the lowest COVID-19 case rates, hospitalizations, and deaths in the nation, to which she gave creditinlarge part to the actions of Oregonians to take seriously the health and safety measures.

"And indeed,today, nearly 70 percent of Oregons older population is fully vaccinated and many communities across our state were well on their way to safely returning to some sort of normal. However, Governor Brown has now done completely the opposite of many other states: imposing yet another lockdown.

"Sadly, Governor Browns proposed $20 million safety net for those harmed by this most recent lockdown is woefully inadequate for those Oregon businesses struggling to survive. I believe Oregon must reopen and stay open.

"The reinstatement of the Governors shutdown solution will do more harm than good to our loved ones, communities, and our state especially as risk drops with an ever increasing number of Oregonians being vaccinated.I am calling upon Governor Brown to reverse this unfortunate decision and focus her attention instead on vaccinations and making sure that COVID aid sent to Oregon by the Federal Government be quickly allocated to those in need."

Meanwhile, Sandy Mayor Stan Pulliam, who's exploring a possible Republican run for governor, says a lawsuit is being filed in federal court against Gov. Kate Brown, on behalf of several businesses and a union.

Pulliam, who says it's time to end the restrictions, said the suit will challenge Brown's authority to extend the state of emergency by executive order


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Bentz urges Gov. Brown to lift renewed COVID-19 restrictions - KTVZ
Daily active COVID-19 cases on the decline, vaccines on the rise – Columbia Missourian

Daily active COVID-19 cases on the decline, vaccines on the rise – Columbia Missourian

May 4, 2021

This is a significant decline in active daily cases from the past two weeks. Last Monday, Boone County had 106 active cases, marking the third week in a row the total hovered around 100.

The number of deaths because of COVID-19 remained at 86. The last death was recorded April 22.

Hospitals in Boone County were in the green status zone Monday, which means they were operating within licensed bed capacity and were accepting patient transfers. There were 13 total inpatients positive with COVID-19 in Boone County hospitals. Of those, there was one patient in the ICU and one on a ventilator.

MU Health Carehad eight inpatients positive with COVID-19 and 43 pending test results.

Truman Veterans Hospital had one veteran inpatient with COVID-19, spokesperson Jeffrey Hoelscher said Monday.

MU reportedeight active student cases and zero staff cases Monday, showing a steady decline since the beginning of April.

The Health Department continues to push vaccine rollout and appointments. In Boone County, 44.3% of residents have received a COVID-19 vaccine and 32.4% have received all doses, according to the Missouri COVID-19 Dashboard. Both percentages are the highest in the state.

MU Health Care will holdanother vaccine eventfrom 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 14 at the Walsworth Family Columns Club at Faurot Field.


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Tracking COVID-19 in Alaska: 1 death and 271 new cases reported over weekend – Anchorage Daily News

Tracking COVID-19 in Alaska: 1 death and 271 new cases reported over weekend – Anchorage Daily News

May 4, 2021

We're making this important information available without a subscription as a public service. But we depend on reader support to do this work. Please consider supporting independent journalism in Alaska, at just $3.69 a week for an online subscription.

Alaska reported 271 coronavirus infections and one death linked to COVID-19 between Saturday and Monday, according to data from the Department of Health and Social Services. The state no longer updates its coronavirus dashboard over the weekend, and instead includes those numbers in Mondays report.

The individual who died was a Wasilla man in his 50s, health officials said.

Alaskas average daily case counts have begun to decline again statewide. However, most regions in the state are still in the highest alert category based on their current per capita rate of infection, and health officials continue to encourage Alaskans to wear face coverings in public, avoid large gatherings, wash their hands frequently and get vaccinated against COVID-19 to prevent further spread.

Alaska in March became the first state in the country to open vaccine eligibility to anyone 16 and older who lives or works in the state. You can visit covidvax.alaska.gov or call 907-646-3322 to sign up for a vaccine appointment; new appointments are added regularly. The phone line is staffed 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on weekends.

By Monday, 308,957 people about 50% of Alaskans eligible for a shot had received at least their first dose. At 263,324 about 43.8% of Alaskans 16 and older were considered fully vaccinated, according to the states vaccine monitoring dashboard.

Alaska in January led the country in per capita vaccinations, but has now fallen to 23rd place among the 50 states and Washington, D.C., according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Of the 264 cases reported among Alaska residents over the last three days, there were 70 in Anchorage, six in Eagle River and two in Chugiak; 64 in Fairbanks; 29 in Wasilla; 21 in North Pole; 11 in Palmer; eight in Ketchikan; five in Kenai; four in Kodiak; two in Anchor Point; two in Big Lake; two in Delta Junction; two in Sutton-Alpine; two in Willow; and one case each in Homer, Houston, Kotzebue, Seward, Sitka, Yakutat, Soldotna, Sterling, Valdez and Wrangell.

Among communities smaller than 1,000 people that arent named to protect residents privacy, there were three in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough; three in the Prince of Wales-Hyder Census Area; two in the Northwest Arctic Borough; and one case each in the Copper River Census Area, the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area and the Hoonah-Angoon Census Area.

There were also seven new cases among nonresidents: two in Anchorage; one in Fairbanks; one in Kodiak; one in the North Slope Borough; one in Prudhoe Bay; and one in a location under investigation.

By Monday, there were 66 people with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19 in hospitals throughout the state.

While people might get tested more than once, each case reported by the state health department represents only one person.

The states data doesnt specify whether people testing positive for COVID-19 have symptoms. More than half of the nations infections are transmitted from asymptomatic people, according to CDC estimates.

Of all the tests conducted over the past week, 2.19% came back positive.


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Tracking COVID-19 in Alaska: 1 death and 271 new cases reported over weekend - Anchorage Daily News